You Can Greatly Reduce Your Grief after Death of a Loved One

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meditating-girl

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In their initial review of studies assessing the efficacy of grief counseling, Jordan and Neimeyer came to a central conclusion: “The predominant finding from these investigations suggests that grief counseling does not demonstrate significant effectiveness. It is plausible that many individuals who undergo such counseling might achieve similar or even superior outcomes without it.” [1]

Fast forward five years to 2008, Neimeyer, alongside Joseph Currier, presented their ongoing research on the effectiveness of grief counseling during the annual conference of the Association for Death Education and Counseling. Their subsequent findings echoed their earlier assessment, indicating that grief counseling offers only a limited degree of assistance, and this benefit tends to diminish shortly after the counseling intervention concludes. [2]

An examination into the effectiveness of physicians in aiding individuals experiencing grief yielded a parallel outcome. Physicians underwent training in a bereavement counseling approach known as PBC (Primary Bereavement Care). The assessment of the impact of this counseling method on their patients in grief revealed that this medical intervention “does not yield significant improvements in the intensity of bereavement, as measured by GEI (Grief Experience Inventory) and TRIG (Texas Revised Inventory of Grief).” [3]

Grief, it appears, maintains its persistence, resisting attempts by both counselors and physicians to assist those grappling with its effects.[3]

Nonetheless, there have been beneficial outcomes stemming from the interactions that grieving individuals have with their departed loved ones. In a study featured in the OMEGA—Journal of Death and Dying, researchers delved into the accounts of individuals detailing their post-death encounters and the favorable consequences experienced by those in mourning. Their findings revealed that these encounters had a profound impact on the participants’ beliefs in an afterlife, their perspectives on life and death, and notably, their experience of grief. Ultimately, post-death encounters played a healing role by fostering a sense of connection with the deceased. As a result, the study suggests that healthcare professionals and counselors should receive education on post-death encounters to create a supportive and empathetic environment for the bereaved to share their experiences.[4]

The authors of that study were referring to spontaneous contacts with people living in the afterlife, including encounters within dreams. However, in 2010, Rochelle Wright, M.S., a licensed psychotherapist in Washington state, introduced a therapeutic approach employing bilateral stimulation to facilitate deliberate afterlife connections between clients and their departed loved ones during psychotherapy sessions. She named this method Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy.

Wright’s approach primarily emphasizes enabling the deceased to guide the interaction, avoiding any interruptions in the natural unfolding of the process, and imposing no time constraints on the duration of these encounters. Remarkably, the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy technique has yielded afterlife connections in an impressive 95% to 98% of the sessions in which it has been employed thus far. These connections often persist for an hour or more, involving active engagements with the departed, such as receiving messages, engaging in conversations, strolling together, embracing, and even sharing kisses. Clients have reported a profound reduction in their grief, with some experiencing its complete alleviation, resulting in transformative changes in their lives.

Recognizing the profound impact of this particular form of grief therapy on clients, we sought to formally assess the extent to which the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy experience reduces their grief. Consequently, a study was conducted, employing the Subjective Units of Distress scale (SUDS), a widely utilized tool in EMDR psychotherapy to gauge the distress associated with a client’s memories.

This study involved 45 participants who engaged in Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy sessions led by Rochelle Wright, M.S., the developer of the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure. The research compared SUDS scale ratings assigned to memories at the outset of the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure with those recorded during or after the procedure. This report outlines the methodologies employed in the study and presents the findings.

Findings of a Study of the Method

The study focused on a group of 45 clients who had undergone Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy experiences. It was specifically limited to those participants for whom Subjective Units of Distress scale (SUDS) ratings had been collected for specific memories both prior to the session and during or after the session. In this investigation, only memories with pre-session SUDS ratings of 8 or higher were included in the sample, resulting in a total of 189 such memories across the 45 clients. Notably, all of these sessions were facilitated by Rochelle Wright, and every afterlife connection occurred within a single session, with a median session duration of four hours. Extended sessions occasionally encompassed additional psychotherapy work in conjunction with the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy.

The Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure demonstrates a remarkable capacity to significantly alleviate the distress associated with memories that were initially highly disturbing. The Subjective Units of Distress scale (SUDS) ratings indicate a substantial reduction, with pre-session average scores averaging 8.5 or 10.71 (depending on the method of scoring scores above 10) dropping to a mid- and post-session average rating of 1.42. It’s noteworthy that all participants in the study experienced successful afterlife connections within a single session. This underscores the profound impact of the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure on grief, a finding consistent across all clients, irrespective of their initial levels of grief.

Given the evidence suggesting that conventional grief therapy often has minimal or no discernible impact on clients’ grief, the highly effective Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure should be considered the standard treatment for individuals coping with bereavement resulting from the loss of a loved one.

Learn more about Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy at https://repairandreattachment.com.

 

Conclusion 

In conclusion, while traditional grief counseling and medical interventions have shown limited effectiveness in alleviating grief, emerging approaches like Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy offer significant promise. Rochelle Wright’s method has demonstrated an impressive ability to facilitate afterlife connections, resulting in profound reductions in grief for participants. The study’s findings suggest that this innovative therapy should be considered as a standard treatment for individuals grappling with bereavement, highlighting the need for further exploration and adoption of such novel approaches in grief therapy.

FAQs

How can I reduce my grief?

To reduce grief, consider seeking support from a qualified grief therapist who can provide guidance and assistance tailored to your needs and circumstances. Additionally, exploring innovative therapies like Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy may offer effective avenues for alleviating grief.

What is Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy?

Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy is an innovative therapeutic approach developed by Rochelle Wright, M.S., aimed at facilitating afterlife connections between individuals and their departed loved ones. This method emphasizes allowing the deceased to guide the interaction, with sessions often resulting in profound reductions in grief for participants.

How can I find a grief therapist?

Finding a grief therapist involves researching qualified professionals in your area who specialize in grief counseling. You can start by consulting directories of licensed therapists or asking for recommendations from healthcare providers or support groups.

How can I have an afterlife communication?

Having an afterlife communication experience can involve exploring various avenues, including engaging in therapies specifically designed for afterlife connections, such as Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy. Additionally, maintaining an open mind and heart, practicing mindfulness or meditation, and being receptive to signs or messages from departed loved ones can enhance the possibility of experiencing afterlife communication.

____________

[1] Jordan, J. & Neimeyer, R. (2003). Does grief counseling work? Death Studies, 27, 765-786.

[2] Currier, J., & Neimeyer, R. (2008). The Effectiveness of Psychotherapeutic Interventions for the Bereaved: A Comprehensive Quantitative Review.  Paper presented at the 30th Annual Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) Conference in Montreal, Canada, April 30-May 3, 2008.

[3] Garcia-Garcia J., Landa Patralanda V., Grandes Odriozola G., Mauriz Etxabe A., Andollo Hervas I. (2005). A Randomized Controlled Bereavement Intervention Study in Primary Care: Preliminary Results. Presented at the 7th International Conference on Grief and Bereavement in Contemporary Society, Kings College, London, July 12-15, 2005.

[4] Nowatzki, N., & Kalischuk, R. (2009). Post-Death Encounters: Grieving, Mourning, and Healing. OMEGA Journal of Death and Dying, 59(2), 91-111.

meditating-girl

You can support this effort to give people the truth about the reality of the afterlife with your $6 contribution.

In their initial review of studies assessing the efficacy of grief counseling, Jordan and Neimeyer came to a central conclusion: “The predominant finding from these investigations suggests that grief counseling does not demonstrate significant effectiveness. It is plausible that many individuals who undergo such counseling might achieve similar or even superior outcomes without it.” [1]

Fast forward five years to 2008, Neimeyer, alongside Joseph Currier, presented their ongoing research on the effectiveness of grief counseling during the annual conference of the Association for Death Education and Counseling. Their subsequent findings echoed their earlier assessment, indicating that grief counseling offers only a limited degree of assistance, and this benefit tends to diminish shortly after the counseling intervention concludes. [2]

An examination into the effectiveness of physicians in aiding individuals experiencing grief yielded a parallel outcome. Physicians underwent training in a bereavement counseling approach known as PBC (Primary Bereavement Care). The assessment of the impact of this counseling method on their patients in grief revealed that this medical intervention “does not yield significant improvements in the intensity of bereavement, as measured by GEI (Grief Experience Inventory) and TRIG (Texas Revised Inventory of Grief).” [3]

Grief, it appears, maintains its persistence, resisting attempts by both counselors and physicians to assist those grappling with its effects.[3]

Nonetheless, there have been beneficial outcomes stemming from the interactions that grieving individuals have with their departed loved ones. In a study featured in the OMEGA—Journal of Death and Dying, researchers delved into the accounts of individuals detailing their post-death encounters and the favorable consequences experienced by those in mourning. Their findings revealed that these encounters had a profound impact on the participants’ beliefs in an afterlife, their perspectives on life and death, and notably, their experience of grief. Ultimately, post-death encounters played a healing role by fostering a sense of connection with the deceased. As a result, the study suggests that healthcare professionals and counselors should receive education on post-death encounters to create a supportive and empathetic environment for the bereaved to share their experiences.[4]

The authors of that study were referring to spontaneous contacts with people living in the afterlife, including encounters within dreams. However, in 2010, Rochelle Wright, M.S., a licensed psychotherapist in Washington state, introduced a therapeutic approach employing bilateral stimulation to facilitate deliberate afterlife connections between clients and their departed loved ones during psychotherapy sessions. She named this method Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy.

Wright’s approach primarily emphasizes enabling the deceased to guide the interaction, avoiding any interruptions in the natural unfolding of the process, and imposing no time constraints on the duration of these encounters. Remarkably, the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy technique has yielded afterlife connections in an impressive 95% to 98% of the sessions in which it has been employed thus far. These connections often persist for an hour or more, involving active engagements with the departed, such as receiving messages, engaging in conversations, strolling together, embracing, and even sharing kisses. Clients have reported a profound reduction in their grief, with some experiencing its complete alleviation, resulting in transformative changes in their lives.

Recognizing the profound impact of this particular form of grief therapy on clients, we sought to formally assess the extent to which the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy experience reduces their grief. Consequently, a study was conducted, employing the Subjective Units of Distress scale (SUDS), a widely utilized tool in EMDR psychotherapy to gauge the distress associated with a client’s memories.

This study involved 45 participants who engaged in Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy sessions led by Rochelle Wright, M.S., the developer of the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure. The research compared SUDS scale ratings assigned to memories at the outset of the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure with those recorded during or after the procedure. This report outlines the methodologies employed in the study and presents the findings.

Findings of a Study of the Method

The study focused on a group of 45 clients who had undergone Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy experiences. It was specifically limited to those participants for whom Subjective Units of Distress scale (SUDS) ratings had been collected for specific memories both prior to the session and during or after the session. In this investigation, only memories with pre-session SUDS ratings of 8 or higher were included in the sample, resulting in a total of 189 such memories across the 45 clients. Notably, all of these sessions were facilitated by Rochelle Wright, and every afterlife connection occurred within a single session, with a median session duration of four hours. Extended sessions occasionally encompassed additional psychotherapy work in conjunction with the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy.

The Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure demonstrates a remarkable capacity to significantly alleviate the distress associated with memories that were initially highly disturbing. The Subjective Units of Distress scale (SUDS) ratings indicate a substantial reduction, with pre-session average scores averaging 8.5 or 10.71 (depending on the method of scoring scores above 10) dropping to a mid- and post-session average rating of 1.42. It’s noteworthy that all participants in the study experienced successful afterlife connections within a single session. This underscores the profound impact of the Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure on grief, a finding consistent across all clients, irrespective of their initial levels of grief.

Given the evidence suggesting that conventional grief therapy often has minimal or no discernible impact on clients’ grief, the highly effective Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy procedure should be considered the standard treatment for individuals coping with bereavement resulting from the loss of a loved one.

Learn more about Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy at https://repairandreattachment.com.

 

Conclusion 

In conclusion, while traditional grief counseling and medical interventions have shown limited effectiveness in alleviating grief, emerging approaches like Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy offer significant promise. Rochelle Wright’s method has demonstrated an impressive ability to facilitate afterlife connections, resulting in profound reductions in grief for participants. The study’s findings suggest that this innovative therapy should be considered as a standard treatment for individuals grappling with bereavement, highlighting the need for further exploration and adoption of such novel approaches in grief therapy.

FAQs

How can I reduce my grief?

To reduce grief, consider seeking support from a qualified grief therapist who can provide guidance and assistance tailored to your needs and circumstances. Additionally, exploring innovative therapies like Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy may offer effective avenues for alleviating grief.

What is Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy?

Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy is an innovative therapeutic approach developed by Rochelle Wright, M.S., aimed at facilitating afterlife connections between individuals and their departed loved ones. This method emphasizes allowing the deceased to guide the interaction, with sessions often resulting in profound reductions in grief for participants.

How can I find a grief therapist?

Finding a grief therapist involves researching qualified professionals in your area who specialize in grief counseling. You can start by consulting directories of licensed therapists or asking for recommendations from healthcare providers or support groups.

How can I have an afterlife communication?

Having an afterlife communication experience can involve exploring various avenues, including engaging in therapies specifically designed for afterlife connections, such as Repair & Reattachment Grief Therapy. Additionally, maintaining an open mind and heart, practicing mindfulness or meditation, and being receptive to signs or messages from departed loved ones can enhance the possibility of experiencing afterlife communication.

____________

[1] Jordan, J. & Neimeyer, R. (2003). Does grief counseling work? Death Studies, 27, 765-786.

[2] Currier, J., & Neimeyer, R. (2008). The Effectiveness of Psychotherapeutic Interventions for the Bereaved: A Comprehensive Quantitative Review.  Paper presented at the 30th Annual Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) Conference in Montreal, Canada, April 30-May 3, 2008.

[3] Garcia-Garcia J., Landa Patralanda V., Grandes Odriozola G., Mauriz Etxabe A., Andollo Hervas I. (2005). A Randomized Controlled Bereavement Intervention Study in Primary Care: Preliminary Results. Presented at the 7th International Conference on Grief and Bereavement in Contemporary Society, Kings College, London, July 12-15, 2005.

[4] Nowatzki, N., & Kalischuk, R. (2009). Post-Death Encounters: Grieving, Mourning, and Healing. OMEGA Journal of Death and Dying, 59(2), 91-111.

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