Study Shows Children Are Born Creative Geniuses and Education Dumbs Us Down

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Children must learn the reality of the afterlife

NASA, renowned for spearheading the world’s preeminent space program and nurturing some of the most brilliant minds globally, engaged the expertise of Dr. George Land and Beth Jarman to develop a specialized assessment to effectively gauge the creative prowess of their cadre of rocket scientists and engineers. The two scientists conceptualized an unconventional evaluation firmly rooted in the concept of divergent thinking—an individual’s capacity to confront a specific problem and generate multiple solutions.

The outcomes of the test proved remarkably productive, so they decided to use the test to learn about the authentic origins of creativity. Does creativity stem from inherent genetic attributes? Is it an outcome of life experiences? Or does it spring from an alternative source?

They embarked on an ambitious endeavor, testing 1,600 children ranging from 4 to 5 years of age, then tracking their development in school. The outcomes of this venture left them profoundly astonished.

From the pool of 1,600 youngsters subjected to the examination, an astonishing 98% achieved scores at the level of genius! The team, energized by this remarkable revelation, decided to continue the testing in a longitudinal study. 

They administered the same assessment to the same children again, five years later. This subsequent investigation, however, yielded astonishing contrasts. These same youngsters, now progressing through grade school, had experienced a precipitous decline in creativity scores, with the proportion at genius level plummeting to a mere 30%. This marked a staggering 68% reduction from the previous benchmark.

Undeterred by this disconcerting turn of events, the team pursued the study once more, this time engaging the same group of individuals, now in their high school years. Alas, the outcomes were even more staggering, as the figures plummeted dramatically to a mere 12%.

Troubled yet fueled by the captivating implications of this study, Land resolved to extend this identical evaluation to adults aged 25 and beyond, with an average age of 31. Through an array of rigorous analyses, his consistent discovery unveiled that less than 2% of all adults achieved genius-level scores. 

To address skeptics questioning the reliability of these findings or perceiving them as isolated occurrences, it is important to underscore that these results have been successfully replicated over a million times.

The implications of this profound study speak for themselves. Our inherent birthright of creative genius appears to deteriorate significantly upon entry into the education system. 

The educational establishment was established to primarily cater to the desires of the ruling elite rather than the general populace. The purpose of education has consistently involved a sanctioned method of widespread indoctrination.

Conclusion 

In conclusion, the findings of the study conducted by Dr. George Land and Beth Jarman under the auspices of NASA shed light on the transformative journey of creativity from childhood to adulthood. The remarkable decline in creative genius scores observed as individuals progress through the education system raises profound questions about the current state and objectives of our educational institutions. It prompts us to reconsider the balance between standardized learning and nurturing creative thinking skills. As we reflect on these implications, it becomes imperative to cultivate environments that foster and sustain creativity throughout all stages of life, ensuring that our society can continue to innovate and thrive in an ever-changing world.

FAQs

 

What is divergent thinking, and why is it important?

Divergent thinking is the ability to generate multiple solutions to a problem by exploring various possibilities and perspectives. It is crucial for creativity as it allows individuals to think beyond conventional boundaries and come up with innovative ideas.

What were the main findings of the study conducted by Dr. George Land and Beth Jarman?

The study revealed a significant decline in creative genius scores among individuals as they progressed through the education system. Specifically, it showed a dramatic decrease in creative thinking abilities from childhood to adulthood, highlighting potential challenges in our educational approaches.

What implications does the decline in creative genius scores have for education and society?

The decline suggests a need to reconsider the balance between standardized education and the cultivation of creative thinking skills. It raises questions about how educational systems can better nurture and sustain creativity throughout individuals’ development to foster innovation and adaptability in society.

How reliable are the findings of the study, considering its replication over a million times?

The study’s reliability is bolstered by its successful replication over a million times, indicating consistent results across various contexts. This robust replication reinforces the validity of the findings and underscores the importance of addressing the decline in creative genius scores in educational and societal contexts.

You can support this effort to give people the truth about the reality of the afterlife with your $6 contribution.

Children must learn the reality of the afterlife

NASA, renowned for spearheading the world’s preeminent space program and nurturing some of the most brilliant minds globally, engaged the expertise of Dr. George Land and Beth Jarman to develop a specialized assessment to effectively gauge the creative prowess of their cadre of rocket scientists and engineers. The two scientists conceptualized an unconventional evaluation firmly rooted in the concept of divergent thinking—an individual’s capacity to confront a specific problem and generate multiple solutions.

The outcomes of the test proved remarkably productive, so they decided to use the test to learn about the authentic origins of creativity. Does creativity stem from inherent genetic attributes? Is it an outcome of life experiences? Or does it spring from an alternative source?

They embarked on an ambitious endeavor, testing 1,600 children ranging from 4 to 5 years of age, then tracking their development in school. The outcomes of this venture left them profoundly astonished.

From the pool of 1,600 youngsters subjected to the examination, an astonishing 98% achieved scores at the level of genius! The team, energized by this remarkable revelation, decided to continue the testing in a longitudinal study. 

They administered the same assessment to the same children again, five years later. This subsequent investigation, however, yielded astonishing contrasts. These same youngsters, now progressing through grade school, had experienced a precipitous decline in creativity scores, with the proportion at genius level plummeting to a mere 30%. This marked a staggering 68% reduction from the previous benchmark.

Undeterred by this disconcerting turn of events, the team pursued the study once more, this time engaging the same group of individuals, now in their high school years. Alas, the outcomes were even more staggering, as the figures plummeted dramatically to a mere 12%.

Troubled yet fueled by the captivating implications of this study, Land resolved to extend this identical evaluation to adults aged 25 and beyond, with an average age of 31. Through an array of rigorous analyses, his consistent discovery unveiled that less than 2% of all adults achieved genius-level scores. 

To address skeptics questioning the reliability of these findings or perceiving them as isolated occurrences, it is important to underscore that these results have been successfully replicated over a million times.

The implications of this profound study speak for themselves. Our inherent birthright of creative genius appears to deteriorate significantly upon entry into the education system. 

The educational establishment was established to primarily cater to the desires of the ruling elite rather than the general populace. The purpose of education has consistently involved a sanctioned method of widespread indoctrination.

Conclusion 

In conclusion, the findings of the study conducted by Dr. George Land and Beth Jarman under the auspices of NASA shed light on the transformative journey of creativity from childhood to adulthood. The remarkable decline in creative genius scores observed as individuals progress through the education system raises profound questions about the current state and objectives of our educational institutions. It prompts us to reconsider the balance between standardized learning and nurturing creative thinking skills. As we reflect on these implications, it becomes imperative to cultivate environments that foster and sustain creativity throughout all stages of life, ensuring that our society can continue to innovate and thrive in an ever-changing world.

FAQs

 

What is divergent thinking, and why is it important?

Divergent thinking is the ability to generate multiple solutions to a problem by exploring various possibilities and perspectives. It is crucial for creativity as it allows individuals to think beyond conventional boundaries and come up with innovative ideas.

What were the main findings of the study conducted by Dr. George Land and Beth Jarman?

The study revealed a significant decline in creative genius scores among individuals as they progressed through the education system. Specifically, it showed a dramatic decrease in creative thinking abilities from childhood to adulthood, highlighting potential challenges in our educational approaches.

What implications does the decline in creative genius scores have for education and society?

The decline suggests a need to reconsider the balance between standardized education and the cultivation of creative thinking skills. It raises questions about how educational systems can better nurture and sustain creativity throughout individuals’ development to foster innovation and adaptability in society.

How reliable are the findings of the study, considering its replication over a million times?

The study’s reliability is bolstered by its successful replication over a million times, indicating consistent results across various contexts. This robust replication reinforces the validity of the findings and underscores the importance of addressing the decline in creative genius scores in educational and societal contexts.

You can support this effort to give people the truth about the reality of the afterlife with your $6 contribution.

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