Physical Scientists Who Have Studied Mediums Conclude Afterlife Communication Is Valid

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Scientists have found proof of life after death

You can support this effort to give people the truth about the reality of the afterlife with your $6 contribution.

A significant number of both physicians and scientists have expressed their conviction after conducting thorough investigations into the evidence surrounding life after death and communications facilitated by mediums. These professionals, often closely involved with patients nearing the end of their lives, possess unique insights into the concept of death and the existence beyond. In fact, a 2005 survey of physicians revealed that 76 percent of them believe in God, while 59 percent believe in some form of life after death.[i] These beliefs persist despite historical constraints within the scientific community against openly discussing faith in God or the afterlife—a legacy of materialistic perspectives prevalent from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, which are now gradually waning.

The individuals mentioned here represent just a fraction of the many scientists who have rigorously examined the available evidence and have ultimately reached the conclusion that life after death is indeed a reality.

Ron D. Pearson – A British scientist, university lecturer, and expert in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, known for pioneering the theory of Survival Physics: “Survival of death is a natural fact of physics and efforts to discredit evidence of survival after death are in error.”[i]

Jan Vandersande – A physicist with three patents related to thermoelectric materials, a consultant to NASA, a former manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a professor at Cornell University, and the current president and CEO of Mountain Province Diamonds. Following an extensive eight-year investigation into materializations involving individuals purportedly from the afterlife, he became firmly convinced that these materializations represent individuals from the realm beyond and that the concept of life after death is indeed a reality.[ii]

Thomas Alva Edison – The inventor of both the phonograph and the electric light bulb, Edison was also a proponent of Spiritualism. He conducted experiments involving mechanical methods aimed at communicating with the deceased. He devised an electronic device he hoped would be able to receive voice transmissions from people in the afterlife.[iii]

Sir Joseph John Thompson – The individual who discovered the electron, held the position of professor of experimental physics at Cambridge, and was honored with the 1906 Nobel Prize in physics. Thompson firmly asserted his belief that human existence continues after the physical body ceases to function.[iv]

Abdus Salam – A Nobel laureate who also served as the director of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Salam delved into research regarding the evidence for life after death and, based on his studies, reached the conclusion that the concept of life after death is indeed a reality.[v]

Sam Nicholls – A researcher specializing in subatomic phenomena, Nicholls developed the belief that individuals in the afterlife are constituted by slightly altered atomic components and coexist within the same space as individuals on the earthly plane.[vi]

Augustus De Morgan – Regarded as one of the foremost mathematicians of the 19th century, De Morgan documented his firsthand encounters with mediums. He expressed his contentment, affirming that the physical mediumship phenomena he observed were genuine.[vii]

 Robert Hare – An emeritus professor of chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and a globally recognized inventor, Hare initially embarked on a mission to establish that communications from the deceased were attributable to either hallucinations or involuntary muscular actions of those involved. However, following a comprehensive and meticulous examination, he reached the firm conclusion that the communications he received from his parents, sister, brother, and dearest friends were indeed genuine.[viii]

James J. Mapes – A professor who held positions in chemistry and natural philosophy at the National Academy of Design in New York, later transitioning to the American Institute. Mapes initially undertook extensive investigations into various mediums with the intention of debunking their claims. However, his perspective shifted, with both his wife and daughter eventually becoming mediums themselves. As a result of his thorough research, Mapes concluded his study by writing that “spirits can and do communicate with mortals, and in all cases evince a desire to elevate and advance those they commune with.”[ix]

 Allan Kardec – A professor versed in the fields of chemistry, physics, comparative anatomy, and astronomy. Following comprehensive investigations into numerous mediums, Kardec arrived at his conclusion “that communication could be received through speech, hearing, sight, touch, etc., and even through direct writing of the spirits themselves – that is to say without the help of the medium’s hand or of the pencil.”[x]

 Alfred Russel Wallace – Co-originator, alongside Charles Darwin, of the theory of natural selection in evolution, Wallace was a naturalist who concurrently developed the concept of “survival of the fittest” alongside Darwin’s theory. Prior to his exploration of mediums, Wallace adhered to a strictly materialistic worldview. However, his investigations into mediums led to a profound transformation, making him one of the most prominent advocates for the existence of life after death.[xi]

 Sir William Crookes – 

A physicist and chemist credited with the discovery of the element thallium, a pioneer in radioactivity, and the inventor of various scientific instruments including the radiometer and the spinthariscope. Crookes initially embarked on a mission to debunk what he considered the baseless claims of spiritualism, aiming to relegate it to the realm of magic and necromancy. However, following extensive investigations into mediums, he authored writings stating that the phenomena observed in séances “point to the existence of another order of human life continuous with this and demonstrate the possibility in certain circumstances of communication between this world and the next.”[xii]

 Sir William Barrett – A distinguished professor of physics who served at the Royal College of Science in Dublin for a remarkable thirty-seven years. Barrett’s notable achievements include the discovery of a silicon-iron alloy that played a crucial role in the development of the telephone and the construction of transformers. In recognition of his significant contributions to science, he received knighthood in 1912. His dedicated study of the afterlife ultimately led him to draw the conclusion that “I am personally convinced that the evidence we have published decidedly demonstrates (1) the existence of a spiritual world, (2) survival after death, and (3) of occasional communication from those who have passed over.”[xiii]

 Sir Oliver Lodge – A professor of physics at University College in Liverpool and later the principal at the University of Birmingham, Lodge was a pioneering figure in the fields of electricity, radio, and spark plug technology. Recognized for his significant contributions to science, he received a knighthood in 1902. Following extensive investigations into séances conducted by Leonora Piper and Gladys Osborne Leonard, Lodge reached a conclusion, stating that “People [in the life after this life] still continue to take an interest in what is going on, that they know far more about things on this earth than we do, and are able from time to time to communicate with us…. I do not say it is easy, but it is possible, and I have conversed with my friends just as I can converse with anyone in this audience now.”[xiv]

Camille Flammarion – A globally renowned astronomer recognized as the founder of the French Astronomical Society and acclaimed for his extensive research on Mars. Flammarion was also a pioneer in the innovative use of balloons to study celestial objects. For over half a century, he dedicated himself to the investigation of psychic phenomena, including mediumship. As a result of his enduring studies, Flammarion arrived at a conclusion, stating that “I do not hesitate to affirm my conviction, based on personal examination of the subject, that any man who declares the phenomena to be impossible is one who speaks without knowing what he is talking about.”[xv]

Charles Richet – A professor of physiology at the University of Paris Medical School and a globally recognized expert in nutrition’s impact on health and disease. Richet achieved the prestigious Nobel Prize in 1913 for his groundbreaking work on allergic reactions. While privately convinced of the reality of mediumship, Richet maintained a public stance of agnosticism regarding the afterlife. According to his close friend Sir Oliver Lodge, Richet came to accept the concept of the afterlife before his passing. In his writings, he stated, “It seems to me the facts are undeniable. I am convinced that I have been present at realities [medium sessions].”[xvi]

Robert Crookall – A former lecturer at Aberdeen University who later became part of the staff at the British Geological Survey, with a specialization in coal-forming plants. Crookall’s profound fascination with research into life after death led him to make the life-altering decision to resign from his geology position in 1952. He chose to dedicate the remainder of his life to the field of psychical research, and in his writings, he wrote, “There is no longer a ‘deadlock’ or ‘stalemate’ on the question of survival. On the contrary, survival is as well established as the theory of evolution.”[xvii]

 Raynor C. Johnson – A physicist and accomplished Oxford scholar, with a doctorate from the University of London. He served as a lecturer in physics at King’s College, University of London, and held the position of master at Queen’s College, University of Melbourne. Johnson dedicated extensive study to the phenomenon of survival in order to form an informed judgment on its validity. After careful examination, he reached the conclusion that “if survival of death is not rigorously proven, it is nevertheless established as of that high order or probability which, for practical purposes, can be taken as the same thing.”[xviii]

John Logie Baird – The inventor credited with pioneering television and the infra-red camera, Baird claimed to have established communication with the deceased Thomas A. Edison through a medium. Baird affirmed the validity of this contact by stating, “I have witnessed some very startling phenomena under circumstances which make trickery out of the question.”[xix]

George Meek – A versatile scientist, inventor, designer, and manufacturer renowned for his contributions to air conditioning and wastewater treatment devices. Meek initially described himself as a “natural skeptic” who found discussions of life after death perplexing. To delve into this concept, he embarked on a global journey, conducting interviews with leading experts in various fields, including medical doctors, psychiatrists, physicists, biochemists, psychics, healers, parapsychologists, hypnotherapists, ministers, priests, and rabbis. As a result of his extensive research, Meek concluded that human beings possess immortality and documented his findings in his book titled After We Die, What Then?[xx]

Archie Roy – Professor emeritus of Astronomy at the University of Glasgow; fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the British Interplanetary Society; and head of the Advanced Scientific Institutes for NATO. After extensive study of psychic and medium activity, he wrote, “I am convinced now of the reality of such [psychic] phenomena.[xxi]

P. Hale – A physicist and electronics engineer, Hale meticulously conducted a series of tests involving electronic recordings of voices purportedly originating from the afterlife. Following his rigorous examination, he arrived at a conclusion, stating that “In view of the tests carried out in a screened laboratory at my firm, I cannot explain what happened in normal physical terms.”[xxii]

Sir Robert Mayer – A businessman and prominent supporter of the music industry, Mayer dedicated time to the study of electronic recordings containing voices from the afterlife. After a thorough examination of this phenomena, he reached a conclusion, expressing that If the experts are baffled, I consider this is a good enough reason for presenting the Voice Phenomena to the general public.”[xxiii]

________________

[i] Ronald Pearson, Intelligence Behind the Universe! (London: Headquarters Publishing Company, 1990).

[ii] Jan Vandersande, Life After Death: Some of the Best Evidence (Denver: Outskirts Press, 2008).

[iii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[iv] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.”

[v] J. J. Snyder, “Science confirms survival,” The Campaign for Philosophical Freedom, www.cfpf.org.uk/articles/background/snyder.html.

[vi] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[vii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[viii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[ix] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[x] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xi] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xiii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xiv] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xv] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xvi] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xvii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xviii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xix] J. L. Baird, Sermons, Soap and Television—Autobiographical Notes (London: Royal Television Society, 1988).

[xx] G. Meek, After We Die, What Then? (Columbus, OH: Ariel Press, 1987).

[xxi] Archie Roy, Letter to Michael Roll, May 19, 1983, Campaign for Philosophical Freedom, https://www.cfpf.org.uk/letters/1983/1983-05-19_ar2mr/1983-05-19_ar2mr.html.

[xxii] P. Bander, Voices from the Tapes (New York: Drake Publishers, 1973), 132.

[xxiii] Bander, Voices from the Tapes.phy

Scientists have found proof of life after death

You can support this effort to give people the truth about the reality of the afterlife with your $6 contribution.

A significant number of both physicians and scientists have expressed their conviction after conducting thorough investigations into the evidence surrounding life after death and communications facilitated by mediums. These professionals, often closely involved with patients nearing the end of their lives, possess unique insights into the concept of death and the existence beyond. In fact, a 2005 survey of physicians revealed that 76 percent of them believe in God, while 59 percent believe in some form of life after death.[i] These beliefs persist despite historical constraints within the scientific community against openly discussing faith in God or the afterlife—a legacy of materialistic perspectives prevalent from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, which are now gradually waning.

The individuals mentioned here represent just a fraction of the many scientists who have rigorously examined the available evidence and have ultimately reached the conclusion that life after death is indeed a reality.

Ron D. Pearson – A British scientist, university lecturer, and expert in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, known for pioneering the theory of Survival Physics: “Survival of death is a natural fact of physics and efforts to discredit evidence of survival after death are in error.”[i]

Jan Vandersande – A physicist with three patents related to thermoelectric materials, a consultant to NASA, a former manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a professor at Cornell University, and the current president and CEO of Mountain Province Diamonds. Following an extensive eight-year investigation into materializations involving individuals purportedly from the afterlife, he became firmly convinced that these materializations represent individuals from the realm beyond and that the concept of life after death is indeed a reality.[ii]

Thomas Alva Edison – The inventor of both the phonograph and the electric light bulb, Edison was also a proponent of Spiritualism. He conducted experiments involving mechanical methods aimed at communicating with the deceased. He devised an electronic device he hoped would be able to receive voice transmissions from people in the afterlife.[iii]

Sir Joseph John Thompson – The individual who discovered the electron, held the position of professor of experimental physics at Cambridge, and was honored with the 1906 Nobel Prize in physics. Thompson firmly asserted his belief that human existence continues after the physical body ceases to function.[iv]

Abdus Salam – A Nobel laureate who also served as the director of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Salam delved into research regarding the evidence for life after death and, based on his studies, reached the conclusion that the concept of life after death is indeed a reality.[v]

Sam Nicholls – A researcher specializing in subatomic phenomena, Nicholls developed the belief that individuals in the afterlife are constituted by slightly altered atomic components and coexist within the same space as individuals on the earthly plane.[vi]

Augustus De Morgan – Regarded as one of the foremost mathematicians of the 19th century, De Morgan documented his firsthand encounters with mediums. He expressed his contentment, affirming that the physical mediumship phenomena he observed were genuine.[vii]

 Robert Hare – An emeritus professor of chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and a globally recognized inventor, Hare initially embarked on a mission to establish that communications from the deceased were attributable to either hallucinations or involuntary muscular actions of those involved. However, following a comprehensive and meticulous examination, he reached the firm conclusion that the communications he received from his parents, sister, brother, and dearest friends were indeed genuine.[viii]

James J. Mapes – A professor who held positions in chemistry and natural philosophy at the National Academy of Design in New York, later transitioning to the American Institute. Mapes initially undertook extensive investigations into various mediums with the intention of debunking their claims. However, his perspective shifted, with both his wife and daughter eventually becoming mediums themselves. As a result of his thorough research, Mapes concluded his study by writing that “spirits can and do communicate with mortals, and in all cases evince a desire to elevate and advance those they commune with.”[ix]

 Allan Kardec – A professor versed in the fields of chemistry, physics, comparative anatomy, and astronomy. Following comprehensive investigations into numerous mediums, Kardec arrived at his conclusion “that communication could be received through speech, hearing, sight, touch, etc., and even through direct writing of the spirits themselves – that is to say without the help of the medium’s hand or of the pencil.”[x]

 Alfred Russel Wallace – Co-originator, alongside Charles Darwin, of the theory of natural selection in evolution, Wallace was a naturalist who concurrently developed the concept of “survival of the fittest” alongside Darwin’s theory. Prior to his exploration of mediums, Wallace adhered to a strictly materialistic worldview. However, his investigations into mediums led to a profound transformation, making him one of the most prominent advocates for the existence of life after death.[xi]

 Sir William Crookes – 

A physicist and chemist credited with the discovery of the element thallium, a pioneer in radioactivity, and the inventor of various scientific instruments including the radiometer and the spinthariscope. Crookes initially embarked on a mission to debunk what he considered the baseless claims of spiritualism, aiming to relegate it to the realm of magic and necromancy. However, following extensive investigations into mediums, he authored writings stating that the phenomena observed in séances “point to the existence of another order of human life continuous with this and demonstrate the possibility in certain circumstances of communication between this world and the next.”[xii]

 Sir William Barrett – A distinguished professor of physics who served at the Royal College of Science in Dublin for a remarkable thirty-seven years. Barrett’s notable achievements include the discovery of a silicon-iron alloy that played a crucial role in the development of the telephone and the construction of transformers. In recognition of his significant contributions to science, he received knighthood in 1912. His dedicated study of the afterlife ultimately led him to draw the conclusion that “I am personally convinced that the evidence we have published decidedly demonstrates (1) the existence of a spiritual world, (2) survival after death, and (3) of occasional communication from those who have passed over.”[xiii]

 Sir Oliver Lodge – A professor of physics at University College in Liverpool and later the principal at the University of Birmingham, Lodge was a pioneering figure in the fields of electricity, radio, and spark plug technology. Recognized for his significant contributions to science, he received a knighthood in 1902. Following extensive investigations into séances conducted by Leonora Piper and Gladys Osborne Leonard, Lodge reached a conclusion, stating that “People [in the life after this life] still continue to take an interest in what is going on, that they know far more about things on this earth than we do, and are able from time to time to communicate with us…. I do not say it is easy, but it is possible, and I have conversed with my friends just as I can converse with anyone in this audience now.”[xiv]

Camille Flammarion – A globally renowned astronomer recognized as the founder of the French Astronomical Society and acclaimed for his extensive research on Mars. Flammarion was also a pioneer in the innovative use of balloons to study celestial objects. For over half a century, he dedicated himself to the investigation of psychic phenomena, including mediumship. As a result of his enduring studies, Flammarion arrived at a conclusion, stating that “I do not hesitate to affirm my conviction, based on personal examination of the subject, that any man who declares the phenomena to be impossible is one who speaks without knowing what he is talking about.”[xv]

Charles Richet – A professor of physiology at the University of Paris Medical School and a globally recognized expert in nutrition’s impact on health and disease. Richet achieved the prestigious Nobel Prize in 1913 for his groundbreaking work on allergic reactions. While privately convinced of the reality of mediumship, Richet maintained a public stance of agnosticism regarding the afterlife. According to his close friend Sir Oliver Lodge, Richet came to accept the concept of the afterlife before his passing. In his writings, he stated, “It seems to me the facts are undeniable. I am convinced that I have been present at realities [medium sessions].”[xvi]

Robert Crookall – A former lecturer at Aberdeen University who later became part of the staff at the British Geological Survey, with a specialization in coal-forming plants. Crookall’s profound fascination with research into life after death led him to make the life-altering decision to resign from his geology position in 1952. He chose to dedicate the remainder of his life to the field of psychical research, and in his writings, he wrote, “There is no longer a ‘deadlock’ or ‘stalemate’ on the question of survival. On the contrary, survival is as well established as the theory of evolution.”[xvii]

 Raynor C. Johnson – A physicist and accomplished Oxford scholar, with a doctorate from the University of London. He served as a lecturer in physics at King’s College, University of London, and held the position of master at Queen’s College, University of Melbourne. Johnson dedicated extensive study to the phenomenon of survival in order to form an informed judgment on its validity. After careful examination, he reached the conclusion that “if survival of death is not rigorously proven, it is nevertheless established as of that high order or probability which, for practical purposes, can be taken as the same thing.”[xviii]

John Logie Baird – The inventor credited with pioneering television and the infra-red camera, Baird claimed to have established communication with the deceased Thomas A. Edison through a medium. Baird affirmed the validity of this contact by stating, “I have witnessed some very startling phenomena under circumstances which make trickery out of the question.”[xix]

George Meek – A versatile scientist, inventor, designer, and manufacturer renowned for his contributions to air conditioning and wastewater treatment devices. Meek initially described himself as a “natural skeptic” who found discussions of life after death perplexing. To delve into this concept, he embarked on a global journey, conducting interviews with leading experts in various fields, including medical doctors, psychiatrists, physicists, biochemists, psychics, healers, parapsychologists, hypnotherapists, ministers, priests, and rabbis. As a result of his extensive research, Meek concluded that human beings possess immortality and documented his findings in his book titled After We Die, What Then?[xx]

Archie Roy – Professor emeritus of Astronomy at the University of Glasgow; fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the British Interplanetary Society; and head of the Advanced Scientific Institutes for NATO. After extensive study of psychic and medium activity, he wrote, “I am convinced now of the reality of such [psychic] phenomena.[xxi]

P. Hale – A physicist and electronics engineer, Hale meticulously conducted a series of tests involving electronic recordings of voices purportedly originating from the afterlife. Following his rigorous examination, he arrived at a conclusion, stating that “In view of the tests carried out in a screened laboratory at my firm, I cannot explain what happened in normal physical terms.”[xxii]

Sir Robert Mayer – A businessman and prominent supporter of the music industry, Mayer dedicated time to the study of electronic recordings containing voices from the afterlife. After a thorough examination of this phenomena, he reached a conclusion, expressing that If the experts are baffled, I consider this is a good enough reason for presenting the Voice Phenomena to the general public.”[xxiii]

________________

[i] Ronald Pearson, Intelligence Behind the Universe! (London: Headquarters Publishing Company, 1990).

[ii] Jan Vandersande, Life After Death: Some of the Best Evidence (Denver: Outskirts Press, 2008).

[iii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[iv] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.”

[v] J. J. Snyder, “Science confirms survival,” The Campaign for Philosophical Freedom, www.cfpf.org.uk/articles/background/snyder.html.

[vi] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[vii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[viii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[ix] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[x] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xi] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xiii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xiv] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xv] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xvi] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xvii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xviii] Tymn, “Distinguished researchers.” 

[xix] J. L. Baird, Sermons, Soap and Television—Autobiographical Notes (London: Royal Television Society, 1988).

[xx] G. Meek, After We Die, What Then? (Columbus, OH: Ariel Press, 1987).

[xxi] Archie Roy, Letter to Michael Roll, May 19, 1983, Campaign for Philosophical Freedom, https://www.cfpf.org.uk/letters/1983/1983-05-19_ar2mr/1983-05-19_ar2mr.html.

[xxii] P. Bander, Voices from the Tapes (New York: Drake Publishers, 1973), 132.

[xxiii] Bander, Voices from the Tapes.phy

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