People in the Room with a Dying Person May Share in the Transition Experience

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Proof of the afterlife

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There are many accounts of people sharing the experience of transitioning with the person moving on to the life after this life.

Raymond Moody, who coined the term “near-death experience” in his book Life After Life[i] in 1975, introduced the concept of shared-death experiences in his 2009 book Glimpses of Eternity: An Investigation into Shared Death Experiences.[ii]

Dr. Moody described being at the bed of his transitioning mother with other family members waiting for his mother’s transition. Dr. Moody said he saw their deceased father in the room, and all reported seeing an unusual light, “like looking at light in a swimming pool at night,” he wrote. “It was as though the fabric of the universe had torn and for just a moment we felt the energy of that place called heaven.”[iii]

View a video of Dr. Moody talking about shared-death experiences at www.earthschoolanswers.com/shared/.

Peter Fenwick, MD, and Elizabeth Fenwick, RN, who research end-of-life phenomena, have collected hundreds of shared-death experiences in the United Kingdom and Northern Europe.[iv] They describe one account by a wife at her transitioning husband’s bedside.

Suddenly there was the most brilliant light shining from my husband’s chest and as the light lifted upward there was the most beautiful music and singing voices, my own chest seemed filled with infinite joy and my heart felt as if it was lifting to join the light and music. Suddenly there was a hand on my shoulder and a nurse said, “I’m sorry love. He has just gone.” I lost sight of the light and music. I felt so bereft at being left behind.[v]

Dr. Pim van Lommel, who has written extensively about near-death experiences, refers to the shared-death experience as an “empathetic NDE.”[vi] Dr. van Lommel describes a shared-death experience of a man whose loving partner, Anne, had been killed in a traffic accident. Her seven-year-old son was severely injured in the accident and was not expected to live. As the boy’s transition neared, Anne’s family gathered at the hospital to console each other. The man stood at the back of the room by a window. This is Dr. van Lommel’s account of what happened.

The moment he died, when his EEG flatlined, I “saw” that his mother came to collect him. You must bear in mind that she’d died five days earlier. There was this incredibly beautiful reunion. And at one point they reached out for me and included me in their embrace. This was an indescribable, ecstatic reunion. Part of me left my body and accompanied them to the light. I know this must sound very strange indeed, but I was fully conscious with Anne and her son as they went to the light, just as I was fully conscious and in the room where all the relatives were incredibly sad because their nephew and grandson had just died. And I joined them. We were heading toward the light, but at a certain point it was clear that I had to return, so I fell back.[vii]

[i] Raymond Moody, Life After Life (New York: HarperOne, 1975).

[ii] Raymond Moody, Glimpses of Eternity: An Investigation into Shared Death Experiences (London: Rider, 2011).

[iii] Moody, Glimpses of Eternity, 49- 50.

[iv] Peter Fenwick and Elizabeth Fenwick, The Art of Dying: A Journey to Elsewhere (London: Continuum International Publishing, 2008).

Conclusion 

The accounts provided by Raymond Moody, Peter and Elizabeth Fenwick, and Dr. Pim van Lommel shed light on the phenomenon of shared-death experiences, where individuals witness and participate in spiritual occurrences during the transition of a loved one. These experiences often involve encounters with light, music, and feelings of profound connection and joy, indicating a glimpse into a transcendent realm. Despite the skepticism that may surround such experiences, these narratives suggest the possibility of a deeper spiritual dimension beyond the physical realm, offering comfort and reassurance to those facing the end of life and their loved ones.

FAQs about Shared Death Experiences:

What is a shared death experience?

A shared death experience is when individuals witness or participate in spiritual phenomena during the passing of a loved one, such as encountering light, music, or feeling a profound connection.

Do people have the same experience at death?

While shared death experiences share common elements like encountering light or feeling a sense of peace, each individual’s experience can be unique, influenced by their personal beliefs, relationships, and circumstances.

What are shared crossings?

Shared crossings refer to instances where multiple individuals collectively witness or participate in spiritual events during the transition of a loved one, suggesting a shared connection to the spiritual realm during moments of passing.

Can shared death experiences occur with any loved one’s passing?

Shared death experiences can occur with the passing of any loved one, including family members, friends, or even close companions. The connection between the individuals involved often plays a significant role in the occurrence of such experiences.

Are shared death experiences scientifically proven?

Shared death experiences are still a subject of ongoing research and exploration within the scientific community. While there is growing evidence and anecdotal accounts supporting their existence, further studies are needed to fully understand the phenomenon and its implications.

[v] Leslie Kean, Surviving Death: A Journalist Investigates Evidence for an Afterlife (New York: Crown Archetype, 2017), 140-141 (citing Peter Fenwick, “End-of-Life Experiences”).

[vi] Pim van Lommel, Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 41.

[vii] Van Lommel, Consciousness Beyond Life, 41-42.

Proof of the afterlife

You can support this effort to give people the truth about the reality of the afterlife with your $6 contribution.

There are many accounts of people sharing the experience of transitioning with the person moving on to the life after this life.

Raymond Moody, who coined the term “near-death experience” in his book Life After Life[i] in 1975, introduced the concept of shared-death experiences in his 2009 book Glimpses of Eternity: An Investigation into Shared Death Experiences.[ii]

Dr. Moody described being at the bed of his transitioning mother with other family members waiting for his mother’s transition. Dr. Moody said he saw their deceased father in the room, and all reported seeing an unusual light, “like looking at light in a swimming pool at night,” he wrote. “It was as though the fabric of the universe had torn and for just a moment we felt the energy of that place called heaven.”[iii]

View a video of Dr. Moody talking about shared-death experiences at www.earthschoolanswers.com/shared/.

Peter Fenwick, MD, and Elizabeth Fenwick, RN, who research end-of-life phenomena, have collected hundreds of shared-death experiences in the United Kingdom and Northern Europe.[iv] They describe one account by a wife at her transitioning husband’s bedside.

Suddenly there was the most brilliant light shining from my husband’s chest and as the light lifted upward there was the most beautiful music and singing voices, my own chest seemed filled with infinite joy and my heart felt as if it was lifting to join the light and music. Suddenly there was a hand on my shoulder and a nurse said, “I’m sorry love. He has just gone.” I lost sight of the light and music. I felt so bereft at being left behind.[v]

Dr. Pim van Lommel, who has written extensively about near-death experiences, refers to the shared-death experience as an “empathetic NDE.”[vi] Dr. van Lommel describes a shared-death experience of a man whose loving partner, Anne, had been killed in a traffic accident. Her seven-year-old son was severely injured in the accident and was not expected to live. As the boy’s transition neared, Anne’s family gathered at the hospital to console each other. The man stood at the back of the room by a window. This is Dr. van Lommel’s account of what happened.

The moment he died, when his EEG flatlined, I “saw” that his mother came to collect him. You must bear in mind that she’d died five days earlier. There was this incredibly beautiful reunion. And at one point they reached out for me and included me in their embrace. This was an indescribable, ecstatic reunion. Part of me left my body and accompanied them to the light. I know this must sound very strange indeed, but I was fully conscious with Anne and her son as they went to the light, just as I was fully conscious and in the room where all the relatives were incredibly sad because their nephew and grandson had just died. And I joined them. We were heading toward the light, but at a certain point it was clear that I had to return, so I fell back.[vii]

[i] Raymond Moody, Life After Life (New York: HarperOne, 1975).

[ii] Raymond Moody, Glimpses of Eternity: An Investigation into Shared Death Experiences (London: Rider, 2011).

[iii] Moody, Glimpses of Eternity, 49- 50.

[iv] Peter Fenwick and Elizabeth Fenwick, The Art of Dying: A Journey to Elsewhere (London: Continuum International Publishing, 2008).

Conclusion 

The accounts provided by Raymond Moody, Peter and Elizabeth Fenwick, and Dr. Pim van Lommel shed light on the phenomenon of shared-death experiences, where individuals witness and participate in spiritual occurrences during the transition of a loved one. These experiences often involve encounters with light, music, and feelings of profound connection and joy, indicating a glimpse into a transcendent realm. Despite the skepticism that may surround such experiences, these narratives suggest the possibility of a deeper spiritual dimension beyond the physical realm, offering comfort and reassurance to those facing the end of life and their loved ones.

FAQs about Shared Death Experiences:

What is a shared death experience?

A shared death experience is when individuals witness or participate in spiritual phenomena during the passing of a loved one, such as encountering light, music, or feeling a profound connection.

Do people have the same experience at death?

While shared death experiences share common elements like encountering light or feeling a sense of peace, each individual’s experience can be unique, influenced by their personal beliefs, relationships, and circumstances.

What are shared crossings?

Shared crossings refer to instances where multiple individuals collectively witness or participate in spiritual events during the transition of a loved one, suggesting a shared connection to the spiritual realm during moments of passing.

Can shared death experiences occur with any loved one’s passing?

Shared death experiences can occur with the passing of any loved one, including family members, friends, or even close companions. The connection between the individuals involved often plays a significant role in the occurrence of such experiences.

Are shared death experiences scientifically proven?

Shared death experiences are still a subject of ongoing research and exploration within the scientific community. While there is growing evidence and anecdotal accounts supporting their existence, further studies are needed to fully understand the phenomenon and its implications.

[v] Leslie Kean, Surviving Death: A Journalist Investigates Evidence for an Afterlife (New York: Crown Archetype, 2017), 140-141 (citing Peter Fenwick, “End-of-Life Experiences”).

[vi] Pim van Lommel, Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 41.

[vii] Van Lommel, Consciousness Beyond Life, 41-42.

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